Discussion:
Growing nice tomato's...
(too old to reply)
D.Reid
2006-06-25 20:22:56 UTC
Permalink
...is alot like bass fishing! It's a pain in the butt. They are finicky...it
takes major effort, patience and expense.

The only reason I keep at is hoping to get lucky!

Dave...(doin his annual "Tomatoe Dance" to the gods) Down in Florida.

(Hey...the Rain Dance worked...I'll try anything at this point!
Steve Calvin
2006-06-25 20:41:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by D.Reid
...is alot like bass fishing! It's a pain in the butt. They are finicky...it
takes major effort, patience and expense.
The only reason I keep at is hoping to get lucky!
Dave...(doin his annual "Tomatoe Dance" to the gods) Down in Florida.
(Hey...the Rain Dance worked...I'll try anything at this point!
Not sure what it's such a pain for ya. I 'till in composted
cow manure each year and they grow like weeds. I'm on NY
state, zone 5b and already have about 15-20 tomatoes on 6
plants.

What problems are you having?
--
Steve
FDR
2006-06-25 21:38:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by D.Reid
...is alot like bass fishing! It's a pain in the butt. They are
finicky...it takes major effort, patience and expense.
The only reason I keep at is hoping to get lucky!
Dave...(doin his annual "Tomatoe Dance" to the gods) Down in Florida.
(Hey...the Rain Dance worked...I'll try anything at this point!
Not sure what it's such a pain for ya. I 'till in composted cow manure
each year and they grow like weeds. I'm on NY state, zone 5b and already
have about 15-20 tomatoes on 6 plants.
What problems are you having?
--
Steve
Geez, I'm in 5 a and still haven't seen a tomato. When do you get yours in
the ground. I have to try that cow manure trick next year.
Steve Calvin
2006-06-25 23:43:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by FDR
Geez, I'm in 5 a and still haven't seen a tomato. When do you get yours in
the ground. I have to try that cow manure trick next year.
Well, I'm in Poughkeepsie NY for your reference. I cheated
this years as we had a very warm spring so I put 'em in
around the first of May. The biggest one on the vines so
far is about 2" in diameter. None ripe yet though.

Are you getting bugs or something or just no growth?
--
Steve
FDR
2006-06-26 14:41:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by FDR
Geez, I'm in 5 a and still haven't seen a tomato. When do you get yours
in the ground. I have to try that cow manure trick next year.
Well, I'm in Poughkeepsie NY for your reference. I cheated this years as
we had a very warm spring so I put 'em in around the first of May. The
biggest one on the vines so far is about 2" in diameter. None ripe yet
though.
Are you getting bugs or something or just no growth?
--
Steve
Poughkeepsie is a far way from Syracuse. Now I understand the difference.
We can have cold weather through the end of May, so rarely do I get anything
in the ground before the last week in May.
Joe S.
2006-06-27 21:53:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by D.Reid
...is alot like bass fishing! It's a pain in the butt. They are
finicky...it takes major effort, patience and expense.
The only reason I keep at is hoping to get lucky!
Dave...(doin his annual "Tomatoe Dance" to the gods) Down in Florida.
(Hey...the Rain Dance worked...I'll try anything at this point!
Not sure what it's such a pain for ya. I 'till in composted cow manure
each year and they grow like weeds. I'm on NY state, zone 5b and already
have about 15-20 tomatoes on 6 plants.
What problems are you having?
He's in FL, thats why it is so tough. In florida we have every known
species of bugs and diseases that double up on us every season because
there is no freeze/frost that helps kill off some generations like you
all up north :) Plus there is alot of sand here, not much good "soil" to
hold the nutrients needed
Thomas
2006-06-26 02:03:18 UTC
Permalink
Well, don't know why it's such a problem for you. My problem is too many
tomatoes. I'm in zone 9 (Texas) . As every year, I stupidly plant too many
plants (9) and I've been harvesting big fat tomatoes for 2 weeks and soon
will have to start canning, selling or giving away. My plants are almost 5
feet tall. Feed the soil, don't feed the plants. Compost, compost,
compost! Do you add epsom salts when you plant? It helps. The manure is
also a good idea. I can send pics if you want to prove it. ;-)
Thomas
Post by D.Reid
...is alot like bass fishing! It's a pain in the butt. They are
finicky...it takes major effort, patience and expense.
The only reason I keep at is hoping to get lucky!
Dave...(doin his annual "Tomatoe Dance" to the gods) Down in Florida.
(Hey...the Rain Dance worked...I'll try anything at this point!
D.Reid
2006-06-26 03:32:51 UTC
Permalink
I have quite a few plants in. They are growing good but just not producing.
I had a few just starting to ripen and they split! after that the bugs got
into them and that was that. I picked a few just turning and set them in the
house, in a window...and they turned rotten!...and/or split. I dont know
why. I have quite a few setting and growing bigger but geeeeeze...I thought
I would have them out the "Kazoo" by this time but it just aint happnin'.
Dave...(just gettin' frustrated I guess) Down in Florida
Post by Thomas
Well, don't know why it's such a problem for you. My problem is too many
tomatoes. I'm in zone 9 (Texas) . As every year, I stupidly plant too
many plants (9) and I've been harvesting big fat tomatoes for 2 weeks and
soon will have to start canning, selling or giving away. My plants are
almost 5 feet tall. Feed the soil, don't feed the plants. Compost,
compost, compost! Do you add epsom salts when you plant? It helps. The
manure is also a good idea. I can send pics if you want to prove it. ;-)
Thomas
Post by D.Reid
...is alot like bass fishing! It's a pain in the butt. They are
finicky...it takes major effort, patience and expense.
The only reason I keep at is hoping to get lucky!
Dave...(doin his annual "Tomatoe Dance" to the gods) Down in Florida.
(Hey...the Rain Dance worked...I'll try anything at this point!
FDR
2006-06-26 14:43:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by D.Reid
I have quite a few plants in. They are growing good but just not producing.
I had a few just starting to ripen and they split! after that the bugs got
into them and that was that. I picked a few just turning and set them in
the house, in a window...and they turned rotten!...and/or split.
Wait until they are ripe. Do not put them on the counter in the house by
the sun since it's bad for them.

I dont know
Post by D.Reid
why. I have quite a few setting and growing bigger but geeeeeze...I
thought I would have them out the "Kazoo" by this time but it just aint
happnin'.
Dave...(just gettin' frustrated I guess) Down in Florida
Post by Thomas
Well, don't know why it's such a problem for you. My problem is too many
tomatoes. I'm in zone 9 (Texas) . As every year, I stupidly plant too
many plants (9) and I've been harvesting big fat tomatoes for 2 weeks and
soon will have to start canning, selling or giving away. My plants are
almost 5 feet tall. Feed the soil, don't feed the plants. Compost,
compost, compost! Do you add epsom salts when you plant? It helps. The
manure is also a good idea. I can send pics if you want to prove it. ;-)
Thomas
Post by D.Reid
...is alot like bass fishing! It's a pain in the butt. They are
finicky...it takes major effort, patience and expense.
The only reason I keep at is hoping to get lucky!
Dave...(doin his annual "Tomatoe Dance" to the gods) Down in Florida.
(Hey...the Rain Dance worked...I'll try anything at this point!
V_coerulea
2006-06-26 22:46:53 UTC
Permalink
I'm in z8 in SC. When high temps stay above 95F it will kill a lot or all
the pollen. Our Better Boys etc are just ripening now. We've had cherry
tomatoes for several weeks. We work compost into the sandy soil every year
and we do stake them for better air circulation and production. They also
stay cooler that way and suffer less bug damage. Birds can sometimes be a
problem. But we usually don't have any production problems until mid
July-Aug with the high temps. Putting out new plants or rooted cuttings in
July brings on a new crop from Sept-killing frost (usually about
Thanksgiving). Don't use too much nitrogen. 10-10-10 is good. Good luck.
Gary
Post by D.Reid
I have quite a few plants in. They are growing good but just not producing.
I had a few just starting to ripen and they split! after that the bugs got
into them and that was that. I picked a few just turning and set them in
the house, in a window...and they turned rotten!...and/or split. I dont
know why. I have quite a few setting and growing bigger but geeeeeze...I
thought I would have them out the "Kazoo" by this time but it just aint
happnin'.
Dave...(just gettin' frustrated I guess) Down in Florida
Post by Thomas
Well, don't know why it's such a problem for you. My problem is too many
tomatoes. I'm in zone 9 (Texas) . As every year, I stupidly plant too
many plants (9) and I've been harvesting big fat tomatoes for 2 weeks and
soon will have to start canning, selling or giving away. My plants are
almost 5 feet tall. Feed the soil, don't feed the plants. Compost,
compost, compost! Do you add epsom salts when you plant? It helps. The
manure is also a good idea. I can send pics if you want to prove it. ;-)
Thomas
Post by D.Reid
...is alot like bass fishing! It's a pain in the butt. They are
finicky...it takes major effort, patience and expense.
The only reason I keep at is hoping to get lucky!
Dave...(doin his annual "Tomatoe Dance" to the gods) Down in Florida.
(Hey...the Rain Dance worked...I'll try anything at this point!
Dawn
2006-06-29 19:24:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by D.Reid
I have quite a few plants in. They are growing good but just not producing.
I had a few just starting to ripen and they split! after that the bugs got
into them and that was that. I picked a few just turning and set them in the
house, in a window...and they turned rotten!...and/or split.
I've had this happen, usually after a dry spell where the fruit has had
a chance to grow a good outer skin, followed by a heavy rain which
causes them to swell. Maybe yours just need more consistent water?



Dawn

Jim Elbrecht
2006-06-26 12:27:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by D.Reid
...is alot like bass fishing! It's a pain in the butt. They are finicky...it
takes major effort, patience and expense.
-snip-

Another thing I have found that helps is to plant several varieties.
If one doesn't like the weather, another might. [it would seem that
maybe someone has compiled a list of heat loving, cold tolerating,
wet loving & dry loving tomatoes]

I'm up near Albany in NY & it looks like I might get a ripe tomato
this year by the 4th of July-- that is the holy grail of tomato lore
in this area. I rarely have any set fruit by the 4th. This is the
first year I've planted Scotia & the 6 Scotia plants are loaded with
small fruit.

Celebrity has a couple fruit- my Brandywine, San Marzano & Roma
plums, Beefmaster, and Sweet 100's all have lots of blossoms, but no
fruit yet. I buy flats of 6 and gave 4 Sweet 100's away, but
couldn't part with any of the others. I'll give away some fruit,
and dry a bunch- the rest of what we can't eat fresh goes to salsa and
chili sauce.

I planted early for this area because weather permitted- mid May,
instead of end of May. The ground was warm & I was prepared to
cover them with buckets if frost threatened, but never needed them.
I mulch with grass clippings once the lawn needs mowing. I feed
once with tomato food as they set fruit. I till shallowly between the
rows of cages.

What has worked for me is;
1. Get them in the ground.
2. Keep them warm.
3. Keep them evenly, but not overly watered.
4. Don't overfeed, but don't starve them.
5. Mix up the varieties in hopes that one likes the weather.

Good luck,
Jim
lhneb
2006-06-27 18:48:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by D.Reid
...is alot like bass fishing! It's a pain in the butt. They are finicky...it
takes major effort, patience and expense.
The only reason I keep at is hoping to get lucky!
Dave...(doin his annual "Tomatoe Dance" to the gods) Down in Florida.
(Hey...the Rain Dance worked...I'll try anything at this point!
Dave,
The truth of tomatoes is there are no rules. I got my first tomatoe
and the plant died.
OK maybe too much fertilizer (the natural sheep kind). Then the Super
Bush VFN are on the corner and something is breaking them off. The
Golden Girl look great with blossoms but are slow to get a tomatoe.
The Celebrity are great here. They really love the Miracle-gro, which
is my favorite fertilizer. It is a late plant and no rain in sight in
Nebraska so you spread out your varieties and use TLC.
Good Luck,
Lucille
William L. Rose
2006-06-29 00:44:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by D.Reid
...is alot like bass fishing! It's a pain in the butt. They are finicky...it
takes major effort, patience and expense.
The only reason I keep at is hoping to get lucky!
Dave...(doin his annual "Tomatoe Dance" to the gods) Down in Florida.
(Hey...the Rain Dance worked...I'll try anything at this point!
Don't tell anyone I said so, but, if you live in the country cherchez la
leach line. 'Nuf said.
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